Archives

Ollie Osborn

Ollie was the first woman to pursue the sport of rodeo full time, becoming a multiple champion. Born to Oregon homestead ranchers, she began competing in the early relay races when she was a teenager. She discovered bronc riding and made a name for herself by riding “slick,” without hobbles, like the men. Remembered for...

Dixie Reger Mosley

Youngest in a family of rodeo performers, Dixie made her trick riding debut at five. She became the first juvenile professional rodeo clown while working Wild West shows. Primarily a trick rider, Dixie successfully competed in all rodeo events, though her specialty was calf roping. She also raised and trained quarter horses for competition. Dixie...

Lilla Day Monroe

Lilla began life as the daughter of an Indiana mill owner. Initially working as a schoolteacher, she became the first woman to practice before the Kansas Supreme Court. Lilla was a political activist who lobbied successfully for the Suffrage Amendment. She founded two journals and promoted progressive welfare, labor and property rights, minimum-wage standards, improved...

Sallie Reynolds Matthews

Sallie endured the hardships of pioneer life, living in the isolation of cattle ranches. Though her formal education was limited to the sporadic presence of country schoolteachers, Sallie wrote Interwoven: A Pioneer Chronicle, a clan story of the experiences and complex relationships that developed between two families as they built a new community in the...

Louise Massey Mabie

Louise grew up on a ranch but was raised to be a musician. Along with her two brothers and husband, she performed as Louise and The Westerners, becoming stars on NBC for nineteen years until retiring. Louise wrote “White Azaleas,” which sold 3 million copies, and “My Adobe Hacienda,” listed simultaneously on the Lucky Strike...

Henrietta King

Henrietta, the daughter of a Presbyterian minister, married Richard King, founder of the King Ranch. As the ranch matriarch, she was known for her hospitality and compassion, extending help to the needy and sick. Henrietta literally created the town of Kingsville by donating the land. When “Captain” King died, Henrietta became the sole owner and...

Ruby Gobble

Ruby can be described in many terms: accomplished horsewoman, trick rider, roping champion, rodeo queen, movie actress, and ranch foreman. Raised on her family’s Arizona ranch, she learned to ride at age three on burros and mastered roping shortly after. Beginning her rodeo career as a trick rider, Ruby switched to roping competitions, quickly winning...

Gene Krieg Creed

In 1925, Gene became the youngest woman ever to win the bronc riding at Cheyenne. She and her sister Vaughn learned to ride before they were five and were soon helping their brothers break wild horses and pursue stray cattle on the family’s Colorado ranch. One of the best cowgirls around, Gene won trick riding,...

Margaret Peg Coe

As chair of the Buffalo Bill Memorial Association Board, Peg engineered and guided the completion the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming. She began a lifelong relationship with the Buffalo Bill Museum as a volunteer when her mother was secretary of the association and her father was editor of a weekly newspaper. After she...

Faye Blackstone

Faye taught herself to trick ride to break the boredom to and from school. At a local rodeo, Faye saw Mabel Strickland ride and thought, “That’s what I want to do.” Much to the chagrin of her parents, she began riding in rodeos, eventually marrying Vick Blackstone, a Texas cowboy. Faye and Vick were rodeo...
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